Featured

The Three That Speak to Us: “Do Unto Others,” “Country Western Singer,” “Dead Critics Society”

Daniel Johnson’s “Do Unto Others,” Alan Shapiro’s “Country Western Singer,” and Mike Dockins’ “Dead Critics Society” are three of the greatest, most thought-provoking poems featured in Best American Poetry’s 2007 edition. Nick and I read each poem in the volume looking for underlying themes, tone shifts, creative new ways of conveying messages, and other characteristics to narrow down the…

Completely Subjective: James Tate’s “The Baby”

  James Tate published this in April 2012. Many of Tate’s poems are character driven featuring a narrator’s various encounters. This poem seems like another encounter between a man and his crazy wife. Tate once said about his characters, “but most often they’re in trouble, and they’re trying to find some kind of life.” It’s…

Completely Subjective: Louise Gluck’s “Reunion”

After browsing through the 2002 volume of BAP, I came across one specific poem that stuck out to me more than others.  “Reunion,” By Louise Gluck displayed a simple message that I could relate to on multiple occasions, and expressed these ideas through writing that required thought and time to understand. While growing up, I have always witnessed my family friends and neighbors go off to summer camp or college during the school year, and then eventually return again.  People come and go, but a lot of the time they are not the same as when they left.  It was…

Completely Subjective: David Wagoner’s “Casting Aspersions”

Connor Sullivan Mrs. Graham Modern Poetry 300 Completely Subjective: David Wagoner’s “Casting Aspersions” As I was looking through the selection of poems in the 2013 edition of “The Best American Poetry” One poem in particular grabbed my attention.  Written by David Wagoner “Casting Aspersions” seems to be just as much a rebuttal to an attack…

Completely Subjective: Charles Simic “Carrying On Like a Crow”

Drew Evanchick Completely Subjective: Charles Simic “Carrying on Like a Crow” This poem does not have a publication date but first appeared in London review books. Three tidbits that seem relevant in this poem. “What do you know about dark clouds? Ponds full of fallen leaves?” “Flapping your wings from tree to tree and carrying on like a crow” “Old model cars rusting in the driveway”   These three lines relate a lot to the pictures below. They describe an almost identical feeling to Pennsylvania in the winter. This poem is about a very rural, abandon area/neighborhood.  Using context clues…

Completely Subjective: Alan Bernheimer’s “20 Questions”

Ever since I can remember, I have always been a very curious child. Why is the sky blue? How do fireflies make light? Do dogs see color or black and white? These are all questions I would constantly ask my mom, hoping she would have an answer that would blow my mind. Most of the time she would effortlessly give me an answer putting it into simple terms so I could understand fully. Some questions though, even she couldn’t answer, and these were the questions that frustrated me most, making my eagerness to know the answer grow even deeper. Sometimes…

Completely Subjective: Adrienne Rich’s “The Architect”

Adrienne Rich’s “The Architect” Published in 2001 in The Paris Review, Adrienne Rich’s “The Architect” is a poem I feel that I understand on a personal level. This poem uses creative language and relatable topics to connect with the reader. I first read this poem while trying to find something to pitch to my class.…

Completely Subjective: Jessica Goodheart’s “Advice for a Stegosaurus”

Advice for a Stegosaurus seems like a simplistic poem at first glance due to the short length of the poem and the easy to understand language, but it has a message that can be missed on a person’s first time reading it. The message is one that a lot of people can relate to because it facing something that nobody can escape and the only thing in life that is guaranteed for every single person. It’s the inevitability of death and how to handle it. It’s something that everybody has to face and no one can avoid. Many people obsess…

Completely Subjective: Stephen Dunn’s “The Imagined”

People, including myself, sometimes live in the imaginary side of the world. I think about unrealistic circumstances where I always come out on top. I dream about things that are unrealistic. These things range from the topics of sports to aspects of my daily life. Last Saturday, I sat in my bed thinking about the…