Completely Subjective: Stephen Dunn’s “The Imagined” - People, including myself, sometimes live in the imaginary side of the world. I think about unrealistic circumstances where I always come out on top. I dream about things that are unrealistic. These things range from the topics of sports to aspects of my daily life. Last Saturday, I sat in my bed thinking about the…
Completely Subjective: Charles Fort’s “One Had Lived in a Room and Loved Nothing” - The poem “One Had Lived in a Room and Loved Nothing,” By Charles Fort, at a first glance is not a long one at all. It is a nice and short one, however in this shorter poem there is a lot of meaning an connection that could be be made. I found a connection through this…
Completely Subjective: Louise Glück’s “Time” - When looking at the title of the poem “Time” by Louise Glück , I thought it was about the complexity of time. But when reading it, not only did the poem explore the many facets of time, it also included some personal moments that I could relate to. The character of the poem was a sickly…
Completely Subjective: Barbara Hamby’s “Ode to Airheads, Hairdos, Trains to and from Paris” - I would drown out everything going on in the world simply by plugging my headphones in and putting the volume on full blast. The train rocked back and forth, skidding to the occasional bumpy stop about every 20 minutes or so. I’d look out the window, constantly being reminded that after a week that felt…
Completely Subjective: Daisy Fried’s “This Need Not Be a Comment on Death” - By the time my grandmother started handing out her lladros, her memory was already erratic at best. I gathered with my sister and cousins in their squat living room, prepared to accept the heirlooms dutifully as if sworn to protect a legacy encased within the tiny figures. While granted, I was a relatively emotional child, I…
Completely Subjective: James Richardson’s “Vectors: Forty-five Aphorisms and Ten-second Essays” - By AJ Scolaro James Richardson’s “Vectors: Forty-five Aphorisms and Ten-second Essays” was first published in Ploughshares in the Spring of 2000. Richardson grew up in the nearby Garden City, and attended/now teaches creative writing at Princeton. Of course I did not know this at the time I chose the poem, but anything written by a professor…
Completely Subjective: Dora Malech’s “Party Games” - Dora Malech’s “Party Games,” first published by The Hopkins Review in the Fall of 2014, focuses on a girl and a pinata. Malech, born in New Haven, now works as the Assistant Professor of Poetry at Johns Hopkins University. Malech has written many poems about the ideas of beauty and truth, however, in this poem…
Completely Subjective: Andrew Feld’s “19-: An Elegy” - When I first read “19-: An Elegy” I was dumbfounded by the title. On the surface, the title seems different, almost as if Feld glued two numbers and two symbols next to each other, and then negligently slapped on “An Elegy.” Feld, who is very much a contemporary poet, published his poem in the spring…
Completely Subjective: Vievee Francis’s “Smoke under the Bale” - A good poem is one that makes you think. “Smoke Under the Bale” by Vievee Francis is a perfect example of a short but packed poem. Though the lines don’t look like much, they will have you thinking hard because of the way the author chose the words. Even I could not make sense of…
Completely Subjective: Charles Simic’s “So Early in the Morning” - Published in The Paris Review of Fall 2013 Charles Simic’s “So Early in the Morning” shows Simic’s emotion and reaction to the recent passing of friend. Simic was born in Yugoslavia and emigrated to the United States as a teenager. He spent the first eleven years of his life living through World War II and…