Completely Subjective: Eduardo C. Corral’s “To the Angelbeast” - I can’t decide if Eduardo C. Corral’s “To the Angelbeast” is about beauty, or about death, or both.The first time I read the poem, I thought it was beautiful. I could imagine the orchard with the grass unmown, two people there together but apart. One would lie in the grass and throw the dirt: “doe…
Completely Subjective: Steve Scafidi’s “Thank You Lord for the Dark Ablaze -    I’m sixteen, I have been for a little while now, but I still don’t have my license. I haven’t been so eager to get it because a car feels like something beyond my control. I know that even when I’m sitting in the driver’s seat it will hurtle on without me. In Steve Scafidi’s…
Completely Subjective: Vijay Seshadri’s “Memoir” - The world is full of countless opinions and theories on the significance of human life. Studies are constantly done regarding the effects humans have on the environment as well as on each other. Does one thing someone says really affect the way another sees the world? I can only wonder. Vijay Seshadri was born in India and immigrated to the US when he was just 5 years old. He published “Memoir” in 2005 and it was published in the Best American Poetry of 2006 volume. “Memoir” resonated with me through the interesting perspective that it offers on life and its…
Completely Subjective: Maggie Smith’s “Good Bones”  - Maggie Smith’s “Good Bones,” published in July of 2016, depicts the conflict between the ugly world and the delicate innocence of a child. A mother of two herself, Smith grew up and still lives near the city of Columbus, Ohio. It was there that she explored the various corners of life, trying to discover the…
Completely Subjective: Maggie Smith’s “Good Bones”  - The year is 2020. So far, the world has dealt with the glowing fires in Australia, the hyped-up threat of World War III, and the death of Kobe Bryant and his daughter. Oh, and the coronavirus pandemic. It seems as if tragedies are happening all around us, and we are just waiting for the next…
Completely Subjective: Jennifer Keith’s “Eating Walnuts” - “This is going to sound super pretentious but” is probably the absolute worst way to start any literary analysis. That being said, this is going to sound super pretentious but the act of eating walnuts in Jennifer Keith’s “Eating Walnuts” is a metaphor for life. Here me out. More specifically, it’s a metaphor for the…
Completely Subjective: Ron Padgett’s “Survivor Guilt” - So here we are again. It’s late and you feel like you’re dying. Everything you’ve ever done that mildly upset someone crawls out of the hole it hides in when you have the energy to fight it and sinks its fangs into your unsuspecting conscience. Ron Padgett’s “Survivor Guilt” ecompasses this feeling beautifully. Still young…
Completely Subjective: Denise Duhamel’s “Humanity 101” - I read a lot of poems very quickly and I don’t really like reading poetry slowly, or at least I don’t really like starting off reading a poem slowly because usually I’ll read a poem quickly and then maybe read it again slowly but I need to feel the rush of a poem building up…
Completely Subjective: Charles Simic “Carrying On Like a Crow” - This poem does not have a publication date but first appeared in London review books. Three tidbits that seem relevant in this poem. “What do you know about dark clouds? Ponds full of fallen leaves?” “Flapping your wings from tree to tree and carrying on like a crow” “Old model cars rusting in the driveway”…
Completely Subjective: Barbara Hamby’s “Ode to Airheads, Hairdos, Trains to and from Paris” - I would drown out everything going on in the world simply by plugging my headphones in and putting the volume on full blast. The train rocked back and forth, skidding to the occasional bumpy stop about every 20 minutes or so. I’d look out the window, constantly being reminded that after a week that felt…