From September, 2016

Completely Subjective: Gregory Pardlo’s “Wishing Well”

New York City happens to be one of my favorite places on this earth; I have a certain fondness for cities in general. While I love the atmosphere cities provide though, there are some negatives when it comes to the people themselves. Cities, especially New York City, tend to get a bad reputation considering the…

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Completely Subjective: Krista Benjamin’s “Letters From My Ancestors”

American writer and poet Krista Benjamin grew up in Lake Tahoe, CA, and received her Bachelor of Arts in Literature from the University of California in San Diego. Benjamin spent the early part of her career writing and publishing for various literary magazines, journals, and newspapers around the California/Nevada region. Later, Benjamin was awarded with an Artist Fellowship from…

Completely Subjective: Carolyn Forché’s “Morning on the Island”

Carolyn Forche is a noteworthy poet known for her work in translations, human rights, and political poetry. Her 2010 poem, “Morning on the Island“, featured in Best American Poetry 2011, was first published in The Nation Magazine. The poem follows the only remaining animals on a seemingly lonely and undisturbed island. Forche’s serene poem teaches us that there is power…

Completely Subjective: Mary Ruefle’s “How I Became Impossible”

Mary Ruefle’s, “How I Became Impossible”, published in the 2004 Courty Green Issue, stands out as a poem with many different interpretations and offers a challenge in order to break it down. Ruefle, author of eight poetry books, taught in the MFA writing program at Vermont College and has been featured in Best American Poetry…

Completely Subjective: Michael S. Collins’s “Six Sketches: When A Soul Breaks”

Michael S. Collins’s poem, Six Sketches: When A Soul Breaks, highlights the sudden downfalls of six different “personas” in a numbered, paragraphical way. First published in the 2002 twenty-fifth volume of the writing magazine Callalo, Collins’s poem has transcended the idea of what it means to be broken. Putting the word in extremely literal but also abstract terms, this…

Completely Subjective: Kay Ryan’s “Home to Roost”

Published in the May 2003 edition of Poetry magazine, Kay Ryan’s “Home to Roost” has evolved into a poem that has quite a bit of personal meaning for me. Ryan, the 2008 U.S. Poet Laureate and the winner of the 2011 Pulitzer prize for poetry, is known for her spare, compressed verses, and “Home to…